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LEC.222: Political Geography


Department: Lancaster Environment Centre NCF Level: FHEQ/QCF/NQF5//RQF5
Study Level: Part II (yr 2) Credit Points: 15.0
Start Date: 12-01-2015 End Date: 20-03-2015
Available for Online Enrolment?: Y Enrolment Restriction: Fully available to all students
Module Convenor: Dr JR Childs

Syllabus Rules and Pre-requisites

Curriculum Design: Outline Syllabus

  • The contemporary world is full of intriguing political developments. Examples range from questions of national independence in the UK, through geopolitical concern with nuclear arms development, to humanitarian crises brought on by civil war. These political moments and their historical trajectories are united by an engagement with space and power; two themes that largely frame what might be called political geography. Against this background, this course will examine both the importance of politics to human geography and, indeed, geography to the study of politics. A range of ‘classic’ staples of political geography will be covered including engagements with geopolitics, nationalism and border studies. Additionally, we will examine social movement activism and mobilisation, security and what it means to be a ‘superpower’. In all cases, theoretical grounding in these core themes will support empirical engagement with a range of case studies, both historical and contemporary.

     

    Following an introductory lecture, there will be three thematic sections of the course broken down as follows:

    Making and un-making states

    • Governance and security
    • Nationalism and post-nationalism
    • Colonialism and postcolonialism

    Power and space

    • Hegemony and ‘superpower’
    • Classical geopolitics
    • Critical geopolitics and the importance of discourse

    Borders, conflict and resistance

    • Borders and migration
    • Conflict and post-conflict
    • Social movements: resistance and negotiation

Curriculum Design: Single, Combined or Consortial Schemes to which the Module Contributes

  • BA Human Geography

    BSc and BA Geography

    BSc and BA Geography (North America)

    BA Economics and Geography

    BA Modern Languages and Geography

    BSc Natural Sciences

    MSci Natural Sciences

  • 50% Exam
  • 50% Essay(s)

Assessment: Details of Assessment

  • The coursework essay will allow for student individuality and expression whilst also allowing students the chance to critically assess and explore ways in which politics and (representations of) geographies intersect.

    The exam will draw directly upon student's learning gained during lectures, and provide the chance to write critically about key concepts such as space, power and governance from a geographical standpoint.

Educational Aims: Subject Specific: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  • On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate that political geography is a key theme in human geography
    • Describe core concepts of political geography
    • Describe the ways in which the study of politics can inform geography and vice versa
    • Demonstrate how critical awareness of political geography can help make sense of contemporary political developments

Educational Aims: General: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  • On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

    • Show evidence of critical thinking and the ability to challenge normative, everyday thinking
    • Work independently, and develop their own frameworks for analysis
    • Communicate ideas and concepts coherently through written and oral presentations
    • Use the theoretical material developed on this course to complement other output across the degree programme, especially in the area of human geography

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  • On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

    • Describe the emergence of political geography and articulate its place within the broader field of human geography
    • Think critically about key concepts such as space, power and governance from a geographical standpoint
    • Critically assess contemporary political developments through an understanding of the ways in which politics and (representations of) geographies intersect
    • Orally communicate core ideas such as nation, governance and geopolitics with confidence and in a critical manner

Learning Outcomes: General: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  • On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

    • Show evidence of critical thinking and the ability to challenge normative, everyday thinking
    • Work independently, and develop their own frameworks for analysis
    • Communicate ideas and concepts coherently through written and oral presentations
    • Use the theoretical material developed on this course to complement other output across the degree programme, especially in the area of human geography

Contact Information

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