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HIST225: The History of the English Lake District: Terror, Ecstasy, and Environmental Change


Department: History NCF Level: FHEQ/QCF/NQF5//RQF5
Study Level: Part II (any yr) Credit Points: 15.0
Start Date: 15-01-2018 End Date: 23-03-2018
Available for Online Enrolment?: Y Enrolment Restriction: Fully available to all students
Module Convenor: Dr CE Donaldson

Syllabus Rules and Pre-requisites

  • Prior to HIST225, the student must have successfully completed:

Curriculum Design: Outline Syllabus

  • This 15-credit module explores the cultural and environmental history of the English Lake District, and it investigates how perceptions of the region have influenced modern ideas and attitudes about the natural world. We start by reading accounts by c17 travellers to the Lake District (many of whom found the region horrifying) before considering the causes of a dramatic change in popular opinions about the Lakeland in the c18 and c19. We conclude by examining the dedication of the Lake District as a national park in the c20 and by discussing political and cultural debates that are currently shaping the region’s future. Along the way we will have the chance to delve into a wide range of important topics. These will likely include (but will not be limited to): the Lake District’s place in the history of environmental activism; the region’s connection with key cultural movements (e.g. the Romantic movement of the early c19 and the Outdoor movement of the early c20); the rise of mass tourism and commercial leisure culture; the development of landscape aesthetics and modern cartography. We will also have a chance to evaluate the effect of the industrial revolution on the Lake District, and we will explore the region’s industrial history and heritage. 

Curriculum Design: Single, Combined or Consortial Schemes to which the Module Contributes

  • Major/combined/consortial programmes administered by History: History; History and Philosophy; History and Religious Studies.

    Single Major/combined/consortial programmes administered by others: French Studies and History; German Studies and History; English Literature and History; History and International Relations; History and Politics; History and Music; History, Philosophy and Politics; Italian Studies and History; Spanish Studies and History.

  • 100% Coursework

Assessment: Details of Assessment

  • Assessments

    • 1 x 2,000-2,500 word analysis of primary source (40%), due in week 5 
    • 1 x 2,500-3,000 word essay (60%), due at end of module
    • A formative assessment will be provided in the form of a bibliographical exercise that will assist with the completion of the final essay.

    Rationale

    The decision to assess this module solely by coursework responds both to the particular importance the Department gives to written coursework and to the specific skills that the Department is keen to assist students with developing in Part II (see the Department's undergraduate student handbook, part 3).

    For the 2,000-2,500 word analysis of a primary source, students will be given the option of choosing a passage of text, an object, or an artefact from a list of nominated sources. Students will also be able to select a passage, object, or artefact of their own, subject to approval by the convenor/instructor. Students will be expected to conduct research on their selected source, and to compose a research-informed interpretation of the source, explaining its provenance, its signficance, and its relation to themes and issues explored in the module.

    This assignment aims to meet the Department's objective of offering Part II students:
    1. The opportunity for close work on primary sources, material originating in the period studied: written documents, artefacts, visual evidence, oral sources, etc.;
    2. The opportunity to undertake an extended piece of written work based in part on primary sources. 

    The 2,500-3,000 word coursework essay will address a topic of the student’s choosing, subject to approval by the convenor/instructor following the formative essay-proposal assessment. The essay will be supported by independent research and by critical engagement with primary and secondary sources.

    This assignment aims to meet the Department's objective of assisting Part II students with developing their ability:
    1. To interrogate, read, analyse, and reflect critically and contextually on secondary sources;
    2. To gather and deploy evidence and data;
    3. To design, research, and present a sustained and independently conceived piece of historical writing;
    4. To write with clarity, fluency, and coherence.

Educational Aims: Subject Specific: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  • The module aims to enable students to:

    • Conduct informed discussions about the cultural, environmental, intellectual, and industrial history of the Lake District;
    • Demonstrate an enhanced familiarity with concepts and key scholarly works that have shaped the study of Lake District and environmental thought;
    • Identify and engage with appropriate digital and print resources to help generate questions and guide historical inquiry;
    • Present cogent arguments about the broader significance of key ideas, issues, and events relating to the module.

Educational Aims: General: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  • The module aims to enable students to:

    • Construct and present sophisticated arguments in written form;
    • Synthesise and evaluate a variety of different intellectual approaches;
    • Interrogate, read, analyse, and reflect critically and contextually on primary and secondary sources;
    • Gather and deploy evidence and data;
    • Design, research, and present a sustained and independently conceived piece of historical writing.

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  • By the end of the module students will be able to:

    • Conduct informed discussions about the cultural, environmental, intellectual, and industrial history of the Lake District;
    • Demonstrate an enhanced familiarity with concepts and key scholarly works that have shaped the study of Lake District and environmental thought;
    • Identify and engage with appropriate digital and print resources to help generate questions and guide historical inquiry;
    • Present cogent arguments about the broader significance of key ideas, issues, and events relating to the module.
    • Design, research, and present a sustained and independently conceived piece of historical writing.

Learning Outcomes: General: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  • By the end of the module students will be able to:

    • Construct and present sophisticated arguments in written form;
    • Synthesise and evaluate a variety of different intellectual approaches;
    • Interrogate, read, analyse, and reflect critically and contextually on primary and secondary sources;
    • Gather and deploy evidence and data;

Contact Information

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