< ENGR202 : Instrumentation and Control

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ENGR202 : Instrumentation and Control

Year:13/14
Department:Engineering
Level:Part II (yr 2)
Learning Hours:150
Credit Points:15
Weight:0.5
Course Convenor:Dr CJ Taylor
Status:Live

Assessment Rules

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  • 80% Exam
  • 10% Coursework
  • 10% Practical

Curriculum Design: Outline Syllabus

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The syllabus is based on three complementary subject areas. The first term considers the dynamic response of systems, whilst the second term focuses on instrumentation and embedded systems. Details are listed below.

Dynamic response of systems and control system design. Modelling 1st and 2nd order systems. Time and frequency response. Transfer functions and block diagrams. Poles, zeros and stability. Feedback control and Bode diagrams.

Instrumentation. Overview of instrumentation and signal conditioning. Resistance based sensors and physical operating principles. Thermo-electric sensors. Analogue to digital conversion. Magnetic and electromagnetic measurement. High impedance sensors such as piezoelectric and capacitance transducers. Acoustic sensors.

Embedded systems. Internal parallel and serial busses and interfacing of mapped hardware devices. Interrupt architectures, mechanisms and software. Concurrent systems: real time scheduling, synchronisation and inter-task communication. Data communication including practical implementations of hardware, software and protocols. Software and hardware engineering, including a brief introduction to the development cycle.

Curriculum Design: Pre-requisites/Co-requisites/Exclusions

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Part 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Educational Aims: Subject Specific: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

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To develop an understanding of system dynamics and feedback at the block diagram level, by providing the student with the tools for the analysis of linear single-degree-of-freedom systems.  To give the student an ability to choose and use appropriate instrumentation appropriate for feedback and data-logging purposes. In particular, to introduce the function and physical operation of a range of common types of transducer and how to condition signals from such transducers, including techniques for noise and error reduction. Finally, to consider how to interface devices such as memory, digital IO and analogue IO to a microprocessor or microcontroller; and how to access such devices from within a program using C and/or Assembler.

Educational Aims: General: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

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To develop students’ ability to analyse engineering problems, create and design solutions to meet ‘real-world’ engineering needs, think and argue critically, and plan and organise their work. To provide students with a wide range of skills to design feedback controllers and so regulate the dynamic behaviour of engineering systems. To give the student an ability to choose instrumentation appropriate to an application and to understand the common pitfalls, short comings and possible solutions to these.

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

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On successful completion of this module students will be able to...

develop single-degree-of-freedom models for simple mechanical, electric and electromechanical systems;

discuss the assumptions necessary to develop such linear models and have an awareness of nonlinear and chaotic systems;

analyse 1st and 2nd order models in both the time and frequency domain, including vibrations and asymptotic stability;

write down the transfer function of a system from its differential equation and understand the significance of the poles/zeros;

manipulate block diagrams of open and closed-loop systems, and design proportional, integral, derivative, velocity and multi-term controllers; construct and use Bode diagrams;

analyse the function and physical operation of a range of common types of transducer, e.g. for the measurement of strain, force, temperature and acceleration;

condition signals from such transducers and apply techniques for noise and error reduction;

interface devices such as memory, digital IO and analogue IO to a microprocessor or microcontroller;

access such devices from within a program using C and/or Assembler and write simple device drivers;

design data communication systems for use with an embedded system.

Learning Outcomes: General: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

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On successful completion of this module students will be able to...

analyse and solve engineering problems with confidence;

create and design solutions to meet ?real-world' engineering needs;

develop effective arguments based on evidence;

summarise findings and draw conclusions from laboratory work;

follow guidelines associated with safety in a laboratory and industrial context;

demonstrate an understanding of the discipline that can be built upon towards further career progression and potentially chartered or incorporated engineer status.

Assessment: Details of Assessment

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Examination of concepts and ability to apply knowledge.
Dynamic response of systems coursework exercise (10%).
Embedded systems laboratory report (10%).

Curriculum Design: Single, Combined or Consortial Schemes to which the Module Contributes

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Core module for all Engineering undergraduate degree schemes.
Lancaster University
Bailrigg
LancasterLA1 4YW United Kingdom
+44 (0) 1524 65201