< HIST200 : The Making of Germany, 843-1122

Contact Information

If you encounter any difficulties accessing Online Courses Handbook information you should contact the student registry:

If you require further details in relation to academic content you should contact the appropriate academic department directly.

Breadcrumbs

HIST200 : The Making of Germany, 843-1122

Year:13/14
Department:History
Level:Part II (any yr)
Learning Hours:150
Credit Points:15
Weight:0.5
Course Convenor:Dr PA Hayward
Status:Live

Syllabus Rules

back to top
Prior to HIST200, the student must have successfully completed:

Assessment Rules

back to top
  • 60% Exam
  • 40% Coursework

Curriculum Design: Outline Syllabus

back to top

There are perhaps few narratives in medieval history more dramatic than the rise and fall of the German kingdom. A fragment of the former Carolingian Empire, it originated as a cluster of disparate and cantankerous duchies with no sense of a shared ethnic identity. It might well have collapsed under the pressure of the Magyar invasions, yet it emerged triumphant under the leadership of new and vibrant dynasty, the Liudolfings. From their base on the north-eastern frontier they would re-found the kingdom, turning it into the most dynamic state in tenth-century Europe. The vast empire they created--the Holy Roman Empire--would endure until 1804 when it was finally suppressed by Napoleon Buonaparte; but in the mid eleventh century the power of its monarchs was hollowed out by a savage crisis from which the realm would never entirely recover--a devastating civil war that lasted five decades, from the mid-1070s until 1122. This stunning narrative raises many questions. Why did it all go right? Why did it then go so terribly wrong? The answers provide crucial insights into the nature of the medieval kingdom and its political life.

Curriculum Design: Pre-requisites/Co-requisites/Exclusions

back to top

Successful performance at part one as per Lancaster University regulations.

Educational Aims: Subject Specific: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

back to top

The module will provide students with: (a) a concise knowledge of the history of the German kingdom and the Holy Roman Empire, c.843 to 1122; (b) a sound grasp of the pivotal events and main trends in this period – that is, a sense of the significance of key events such as the Battle of the Lech (AD 955); (c) an understanding of medieval kingship and of the political culture of the early medieval kingdom; and (d) an understanding of the concepts and terms that historians have used to analyse and to make sense of this period – concepts such as Spielregeln (the rules of the game), ‘lordship’, amicitia (friendship), and so on. The module will help them to appreciate the interconnectedness of various kinds of history--social, economic, cultural, religious and political.

Educational Aims: General: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

back to top

On successful completion of this module students will be able to –

(i) Demonstrate the ability to construct and present effective arguments from primary and secondary textual evidence, as evidenced through seminar presentations and discussions and formal essays;

(ii) Demonstrate the ability to analyse and evaluate rival interpretations of available information;

(iii) Use LUVLE, word processing software and other IT tools to analyse and present their arguments.

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

back to top

On successful completion of this module students will be able to demonstrate in the context of their coursework and the examination a grasp of: (a) the history of the German kingdom and the Holy Roman Empire, c.843 to 1122; (b) the privotal events and main trends in this period; (c) medieval kingship and the political culture of the early medieval kingdom; and (d) an understanding of the concepts that historians have used to analyse and to make sense of this period.

Learning Outcomes: General: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

back to top

On successful completion of this module students will be able to demonstrate in the context of their coursework and the examination an ability to: (1) write essays and to develop arguments to seminar discussions more effectively; (2) analyse and evaluate rival interpretations more effectively; (3) use textual evidence available in English translation to construct their own arguments; and (4) use computers and word processing software more effectively, having used LUVLE and other IT tools to prepare for both their essays and the examination.

Assessment: Details of Assessment

back to top
Examination (60% of final assessment):
Students will take a 2 hour unseen exam in the main summer assessment period, comprising two essay questions.

Coursework (40% of final assessment): One essay (2500 words) that is due in week ten of the term in which the module is taught..

Curriculum Design: Single, Combined or Consortial Schemes to which the Module Contributes

back to top

Major/combined/consortial programmes administered by History: History, Medieval and Renaissance Studies; History and Philosophy; History and Religious Studies; Social History. Single Major/combined/consortial programmes administered by others: French Studies and History; German Studies and History; English Literature and History; History and International Relations; History and Politics; History and Music; History, Philosophy and Politics; Italian Studies and History; Spanish Studies and History.

Lancaster University
Bailrigg
LancasterLA1 4YW United Kingdom
+44 (0) 1524 65201