< Environmental and Biochemical Toxicology : MSc (Full Time)

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Environmental and Biochemical Toxicology

MSc (Full Time)

Year:14/15
UCAS Code:none
Minimum Length:12 Month(s)
Maximum Length:12 Month(s)
Credit Points:180
Director of Studies:Professor FL Martin

Educational Aims: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

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Subject Specific – Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

The course covers the underlying principals of toxicology, i.e., the adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms. Students will gain an appreciation of the diverse applications of toxicology from mechanistic considerations to risk assessment. This incorporates an understanding of toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics with particular emphasis on biotransformation and xenobiotic actions/interactions. Students will also appreciate the human health effects of various environmental exposures in terms of biotransformation, induction of somatic mutations, neurological impairments, epidemiology, etc. There will be practical experience of cutting-edge techniques required for risk assessment in toxicology, primarily short-term tests.

General – Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

Beyond the core modules, students can concentrate either on taught elements in the life sciences or environmental science. Students should acquire skills in appropriate problem solving, conducting background research and problem-solving. The research project provides the opportunity for closer staff-student interactions where first-hand application and choice of subject-driven techniques will occur within a research-active environment.

 

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

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 Subject Specific – Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

On successful completion of this scheme of study, students will:

  • Appreciate the underlying principals of toxicology, i.e., the adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms. This will include being able to identify the three main categories of toxicology and how they inter-connect. Students should also be able to explain the main underlying principles of in vitro/in vivo regulatory toxicology and possess a practical working knowledge of important state-of-the-art assays.
  • Appreciate the diverse applications of toxicology from mechanistic considerations to risk assessment. This incorporates a strong understanding of toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics with particular emphasis on biotransformation and xenobiotic actions/interactions. Students should also understand the diverse mechanisms by which different agents may play an important role in cancer causation alongside epidemiological evidence.
  • Appreciate the human health effects of various environmental exposures in terms of biotransformation, induction of somatic mutations, neurological impairments, epidemiology etc.
  • Practical experience of cutting edge techniques. The research project provides the opportunity for closer staff-student interactions where first-hand application and choice of subject-driven techniques will occur within a research-active environment

The student will gain insight and experience of scientific methodology. On completion of the programme, it is expected that the student will develop the following intellectual skills:

  • Ability to develop a robust scientific argument, formulate and test hypotheses, and to assess contrasting scientific theories.
  • Problem solving and decision making, identifying, abstracting and synthesizing relevant scientific and technical information.
  • Self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, acting autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or equivalent level.
  • The use of experimentation within a scientific problem solving exercise and handling complexity and uncertainty.

General – Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

On successful completion of this scheme of study, students should be able to:

The student will gain a variety of transferable skills essential for the effective communication of science. The minimum range of generic skills that a student is expected to gain is set by the compulsory Graduate Training Programme element of the course. These transferable skills are further developed through the varied methods of delivery and assessment within the taught elements of the programme. The range of transferable skills that students are expected to gain includes:

  • IT literacy in mainstream word-processing, analysis and presentation software
  • Presenting information in verbal, electronic and hardcopy media
  • Appreciate how the underlying principals of toxicology can be applied to living organisms
  • Source, analyze and summarize scientific literature
  • Appreciate how the scientific community disseminates knowledge Design, interpret and report investigation programmes and experiments
  • Numeracy, including mathematical and statistical modeling
  • Project management
  • Knowledge of how to apply for research funding

 

Structure, Features and Regulations: Compulsory and Optional Modules

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Compulsory Modules

BIOL431 Toxicological Mechanisms and Measurements

BIOL432 Consequences of Toxicological Effects

LEC.501 Dissertation Project (A 90 credit research project, generally in a research laboratory.)

Optional Modules

Select FOUR optional modules.  Your number of credits across core and optional modules must total 180 (185 acceptable).  You should aim to balance your taught modules across each term OR take more in the earlier terms.

BIOL405  Biological Effects of Air Pollution and Climate Change

BIOL421  Data Analysis and Interpretation

BIOL434  Immunology

BIOL435  Microbes and Disease

BIOL437  Molecular Basis of Cancer

BIOL461  Fundamental Research Skills (BLS)

BIOL 462  Molecular Biology Research Skills (BLS)

BIOL 463  Cell Biology Research Skills (BLS)

BIOL467 Drug Development (from concept to clinic)

CHIC565  Environmental Epidemiology

ENV.431  Pollution Microbiology

ENV.432 Chemical Risk Assessment

ENV.434 Contaminated Land and Remediation

ENV.435 Environmental Toxicology

GEOG422  Disaster Management

LEC.422  Data Assimilation and Integration

LEC.425  Environmental Sampling and Analysis for Trace Organics

LEC.430  Behaviour of Pollutants in the Environment

LEC.438  Safety and Environmental Impact Assessment: An Industrial Perspective

LL.M5238  Environmental Law

MATH563  Clinical Trials

MATH564  Principles of Epidemiology

MATH572  Genomics Technologies and Analysis of it's Data

LEC.440   Numberical Skills (unassessed study - to be taken as required)

 

Lancaster University
Bailrigg
LancasterLA1 4YW United Kingdom
+44 (0) 1524 65201